Miscellaneous

Should a child be retained in kindergarten?

Should a child be retained in kindergarten?

Repeating Kindergarten: The Research There is a vast amount of scientific research showing that children do not benefit by being held back in grade school. But there is very little out there about holding a child back in kindergarten to wait another year before starting first grade.

When should a child be retained?

4). A child may be considered for retention if he or she has poor academic skills, is small in stature or the youngest in the grade, has moved or been absent frequently, does poorly on a prescreening assessment, or has limited English-language skills.

What does it mean if your child has been retained?

Grade retention, also called repeating a grade, is the act of placing a student in the same grade for a second year. Although failure to master grade-level academic skills is the most common reason for retaining a student (Picklo & Christenson, 2005), students are sometimes retained for non-academic reasons.

Should my 5 year old repeat kindergarten?

Yes. According to EC Section 48011, a child may not continue in kindergarten for more than one year past the year he or she first attended kindergarten.

Can I refuse my child being retained?

A parent has a right to appeal the decision to promote or retain a child. More important than a decision to have the student promoted or retained at this level is the need for the student to receive additional instructional intervention that will help to improve academic performance.

Should struggling students be retained?

Implications for Families and Educators Retaining students based on reading proficiency can produce large improvements in academic performance when compared to grade-level peers. Retention is not an academic death sentence. In fact, it can lead to better preparation when entering high school.

Should I start my child in kindergarten at 5 or 6?

You want your child to have the best start in school. In 1975, only nine states required that a child be age 5 before enrolling. By 2010, 37 states had this requirement, and more are following suit. Now, more parents even consider waiting until a child is 6 before starting kindergarten.

Who decides if a child is retained?

Rather the decision-makers — which in most schools typically includes the parents, teacher and principal — should consider the following factors: Grade Level: A child adjusts better if retained in the early elementary grades, namely kindergarten and first grade.

Can a child be retained twice?

Is there a law or policy regarding the number of times a student can be retained? There is nothing in the EC that prohibits school districts from retaining a child in more than one grade. Some districts’ PPR policies prohibit students from repeating more than one elementary grade.